Community Messages

Friday, June 14
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

07:00 PM

The Fidgets Improv Comedy Kingston

07:00 PM — 09:00 PM

Come join us for a night of laughter and fun at Bay Park Baptist Church. Our talented improv comedians will have you rolling in the aisles with their quick wit and hilarious antics. Whether you're a longtime fan of improv or just looking for a good time, this event is perfect for everyone.

Don't miss out on this opportunity to see some of the best improv comedy in Kingston. Grab your friends and family and get ready for a night of non-stop laughter. We can't wait to see you there!

All proceeds will support the launch of a Christian high school in Kingston this fall. Spaces still available for Grade 9. Inquire today! www.kingstonchristianschool.ca.

Register:
https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/the-fidgets-improv-comedy-kingston-tickets-899323048447

Location/Venue Name
Bay Park Baptist Church

  • 775 Progress Ave., Kingston, K7M 6R8
Saturday, June 15
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

10:00 AM

Kilometers for Kids - Run | Walk | Roll for KidsInclusive

10:00 AM — 12:00 PM

The 27th Annual Kilometres for Kids - Run•Walk•Roll will be held on Saturday June 15th at Kingston Secondary School (145 Kirkpatrick  Street)! 

Our Run/Walk/Roll is KidsInclusive’s sole fundraising event and is known as much for its incredible spirit as for the number of people who hit the streets to raise funds for our clients with special needs. 

1 km fun run/walk/roll - self timed (10 a.m. start time)
5 km run/walk/roll - self timed (10:30 a.m. start time)


All proceeds from the Kilometres for Kids - Run•Walk•Roll for KidsInclusive help support our clients and their families through the purchase of specialized equipment, training and education, programs and initiatives and to assist families with the exceptional costs of raising a child with special needs.

Choose the distance that best suits you and get out here to support KidsInclusive. We look forward to seeing you on race day!

Location/Venue Name
Kingston Secondary School

  • 145 Kirkpatrick  Street, Kingston, K7K 2P4
02:00 PM

KBS Presents: Al Lerman

02:00 PM — 05:00 PM

"For those looking for great acoustic blues, Al Lerman is a must!" - Rootstime, Belgium "A real treat for the ears. Fresh and invigorating...you'll find yourself listening to a master of the game. A blues winner." The Rocker, UK Tickets are $15 and are available at the Club. Call (613) 542-8152 to purchase by credit card or bruce@kingstonbluessociety.ca to pay by e-transfer Call (613) 384-8168 for further details

08:00 PM

Big Phat Horn Band

08:00 PM — 11:00 PM

The Club staple on a different night! A ten piece band featuring 6 horns and vocalist Michael K. Myers. Their selection of music spans several decades with most material being Number 1 Hits. Tickets are $25 and are available at the Club or call (613) 542-8152 to purchase by credit card.

Sunday, June 16
All day

Live Music Sundays 2024

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Live Music Sundays 2024. Come down to the shoreline and listen to a variety of local musicians. Finkle's Shore Park, Sundats at 3pm.

Location/Venue Name
Finkle's Shore Park

  • Kingston, Kingston, K1s4s2
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

04:30 PM

Fish Fry

04:30 PM — 06:30 PM

Fish Fry  Take Out Only

Sunday June 15th, 2024   4:30pm to 6:30pm

Dinner includes 2 pieces of fish, fries, cole slaw and brown beans

Advance Ticket Sales Only

St John's Presbyterian Church, 2360 Middle Road, Kingston, Ontario

For tickets: Gail 613 542 0997

 

Location/Venue Name
St John's Presbyterian Church

  • 2360 Middle Road, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 4V3
Monday, June 17
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

Tuesday, June 18
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

Wednesday, June 19
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

Thursday, June 20
All day

Roast Beef and Strawberry Dinner Thursday June 20

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Roast Beef and Strawberry Dinner at Cooke's-Portsmouth United Church

200 Norman Rogers Drive on Thursday June 20th at  5:00p.m.

$22.00 per person, $7.00 for children 5-12

80 people to be served. For tickets email cpucevents@gmail.com

Location/Venue Name
Cooke's-Portsmouth United Church

  • 200 Norman Rogers Drive, Kingston, K7M 2R4
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

12:00 PM

Inspiring People

12:00 PM — 02:30 PM

Motivate, connect, and celebrate Kingston's business community. The 2024 Inspiring People panel brings different life experiences to share what motivates them every day.

 

Meet the panel and the Moderator: 

- Sahiza Hossenbaccus - President and CFO of SnapCab (Panelist)

- Lucas Heney - Creative Director of James Media (Panelist)

- Leanne O'Mara - Owner of six local Tim Hortons, J.E. Agnew Food Services Ltd. (Panelist)

- Bill Hutchins - News Anchor at CKWS-TV in Kingston (Moderator)

 

Join us for a luncheon on Thursday, June 20th from 12pm-2:30pm at the Holiday Inn Kingston Waterfront. Let's inspire lives and businesses together! Thank you to our Title Sponsor Empire Life and our Partner Sponsors Veritasa Law Office Professional Corporation and COGECO. Purchase your tickets now: https://www.kingstonchamber.ca/

Location/Venue Name
Holiday Inn Kingston Waterfront

  • 2 Princess Street, Kingston, K7L 1A2
Friday, June 21
All day

Movie in the Park

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Friday, June 21, 2024 

Time: Movie begins at dusk (an approximate time will be announced closer to June 21st)

Movie: Migration (2023 animated movie)

Location: Conservation Park (10 Pearl Street)

Location/Venue Name
Conservation Park

  • 10 Pearl st, Napanee, K7L4S6
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

Saturday, June 22
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

Sunday, June 23
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

Monday, June 24
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

Tuesday, June 25
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

Wednesday, June 26
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

Thursday, June 27
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

Friday, June 28
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

Saturday, June 29
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

Sunday, June 30
All day

Vendors Needed for September 21, 2024

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Vendors are needed for September 21, 2024 for a Craft Sale at Cooke's-Portsmouth United

200 Norman Rogers Drive  from 9:00am - 1:00pm

Free Parking in large parking lot for you and your customers.

To reserve a table contact Cheryl @cpucevents@gmail,com 

 

 

Location/Venue Name
Cooke's-Portsmouth United Church

  • 200 Norman Rogers Drive, Kingston, K7M 2R4
All day

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Join us to help raise awareness about stroke and aphasia!

June is Stroke and Aphasia Awareness Month.  Please take some time to learn about the signs of a stroke, what to do if someone is experiencing the signs, how to reduce the risk of a stroke and how you can help those who have been affected by stroke and aphasia.  

Did you know …….. There are over 108,707 new strokes in Canada annually. That means in our communities a person has a stroke every 5 minutes. It is estimated that over 878,500 Canadians are living with the affects of stroke and that number is expected to continue to rise.   

A stroke is a medical emergency!  Call 911 immediately and act FAST if you witness a person having any of these key signs: Face is drooping, Arm weakness, Speech is slurred. Time is important as brain damage can occur very quickly. The paramedics can safely transport the person to the most appropriate hospital that offers specialized treatment for stroke.  

Stroke is ……… Sometimes called a "brain attack". A stroke occurs when the blood flow to any part of the brain is interrupted or stopped. Each person is affected differently by a stroke depending on what part of the brain was impacted and the amount of damage. A stroke can result in, challenges with movement, communication, thinking, vision, fatigue, emotions and how we understand the world around us.  Learn about both the invisible and visible effects from stroke and how you can help to support a stroke survivor and their family when they return to the community.

Aphasia is ……… A communication and language disorder.  It does not affect intelligence! Aphasia is caused by an injury to the parts of the brain related to communication, most often due to a stroke. Aphasia can impair a person’s ability to speak and/or to understand, read or write. Learn about accessible communication and how you can help to support a person with aphasia through special conversation techniques. 

Did you know …… According to the Canadian Stroke Best Practices, 21-38% of people experiencing a stroke will also experience aphasia. It is estimated that over 100,000 people in Canada have aphasia. Communication access is an essential part of accessibility for persons with aphasia.

Here are some accessible communication strategies to use. Give time! Allow time to process and to respond in all interactions. Do not speak too fast and check often for understanding (e.g. did I understand you to say…..). Stick to one topic at a time. Use other ways to communicate such as writing, drawing, pictures, yes/no cards and gestures.  

Stroke Services at Greater Kingston Victorian Order of Nurses (GK VON) provide invaluable supports to those directly and indirectly affected by stroke, check us out online (https://von.ca/en/von-care/stroke-and-aphasia-support-services).

Support from GK VON Stroke Services is free and available to anyone affected by stroke, including stroke survivors and caregivers.  Programming includes a variety of support groups for stroke survivors and caregivers offered in person and virtually. These groups help participants manage the life changes associated with stroke, including aphasia, as they meet with and learn from others who are on similar recovery journeys. GK VON also has educational resources and programs, such as the Regional Stroke Education Program and the Aphasia Supportive Conversation™ Group which is facilitated by a Speech Language Pathologist.  

Contact GK VON Stroke Services to connect with supports, to learn more about stroke and aphasia, and to volunteer with us! 

 

Thank you,

Emilia Leslie

GK VON Stroke Services

Emilia.leslie@von.ca

(613) 634-0130, ext. 3469

 

Monday, July 1
All day

Canada Homestay Network - Looking for Host Families

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

We have an urgent need for host families to accommodate university students from Japan. Since 1995, we’ve helped tens of thousands of international students find homes away from home with local families in Canada including right here in Kingston.  

When we welcome international students into our schools, our education programs benefit, our community benefits, and local students are offered life-changing experiences that positively shape their worldviews. 

Hosts across our network agree that homestay has changed their lives through life-long friendships and lasting connections throughout the world. They enjoy sharing what our province and city have to offer, including our values and unique way of life.  

As members of CHN, hosts get 24/7 emergency support, social and cultural integration training, and an allowance to help offset expenses.  

Hosts provide the same support, guidance, and attention you would want for your loved ones travelling overseas, including a welcoming, caring, patient, and safe home environment. Additionally, hosts provide their students: 
 

  • Three nutritious meals per day  

  • A private bedroom with storage and study space  

  • Utilities including laundry and Internet  
     

For more information about hosting, visit whyihost.ca.  

All day

Canada Homestay Network - Looking for Host Families

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

We have an urgent need for host families to accommodate university students from Japan. Since 1995, we’ve helped tens of thousands of international students find homes away from home with local families in Canada including right here in Kingston.  

When we welcome international students into our schools, our education programs benefit, our community benefits, and local students are offered life-changing experiences that positively shape their worldviews. 

Hosts across our network agree that homestay has changed their lives through life-long friendships and lasting connections throughout the world. They enjoy sharing what our province and city have to offer, including our values and unique way of life.  

As members of CHN, hosts get 24/7 emergency support, social and cultural integration training, and an allowance to help offset expenses.  

Hosts provide the same support, guidance, and attention you would want for your loved ones travelling overseas, including a welcoming, caring, patient, and safe home environment. Additionally, hosts provide their students: 
 

  • Three nutritious meals per day  

  • A private bedroom with storage and study space  

  • Utilities including laundry and Internet  
     

For more information about hosting, visit whyihost.ca.  

Sunday, July 7
All day

Music by the River

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

The Town of Greater Napanee is excited to present another year of Music by the River! Our Music by the River concert series brings community members young and old together for a wonderful afternoon of enjoying our community's local talent in Conservation Park.

  • Dates available are: July 7th, July 21st, August 11th, and August 25th (Sundays - Rain or Shine)
  • Time: Running from approximately 1:00 pm until 4:00 pm
  • Location: Conservation Park (10 Pearl Street)
  • Opening acts will perform for 30-45 minutes, headlining acts will perform for 1 hour to 1.5 hours

Stay tuned for a list of performers that will be attending each date!

Location/Venue Name
Napanee

  • Conservation Park, Napanee, Napanee, K7L4S6
Thursday, July 11
All day

Napanee Country Music Jamboree

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Napanee Country Music Jamboree, July 11-13th, 2024. Windowdoorman, 161 York Street, Napanee Ontario

Location/Venue Name
Napanee

  • 161 York ST, Napanee, k;7l4s3
Friday, July 12
All day

Napanee Country Music Jamboree

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Napanee Country Music Jamboree, July 11-13th, 2024. Windowdoorman, 161 York Street, Napanee Ontario

Location/Venue Name
Napanee

  • 161 York ST, Napanee, k;7l4s3
Saturday, July 13
All day

Napanee Country Music Jamboree

12:00 AM — 11:59 PM

Napanee Country Music Jamboree, July 11-13th, 2024. Windowdoorman, 161 York Street, Napanee Ontario

Location/Venue Name
Napanee

  • 161 York ST, Napanee, k;7l4s3